Ashcroft

Date of Entry: 30/05/2017
Surname: Ashcroft
Christian Names: Cristine aka Crissy
Country: Australia
State or Province: New South Wales
City or Town: Sydney
Service: Austrialian Army
Branch: Pay Corps
Commencement of service: 1998
Completion of service: 2016
Case Management Notes:

 

Cristine or Crissy Ashcroft was born on the 12 July, 1966. Ashcroft had three years Australian Army Reserve service from 1998 to 2001, when she then discharged. She again enlisted in the Australian Army Reserves in November, 2004, and was eventually posted to the RAAPC .

Ashcroft subsequently transferred to continuous full time duty with the Australian Army in the RAAPC in 2008, and subsequently to the Australian Regular Army in 2010.

In late 2009, Ashcroft was deployed to Australian Special Operations Task Group (SOTG) Afghanistan, as a member of the Royal Australian Army Pay Corps, (RAAPC) attached to 1 Commando Regiment, Operation Slipper. Her position was Finance Clerk, Corporal RAAPC, a sedentary role. She was based at Camp Russell.


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Ashcroft's duties consisted of financial and clerical administration. By all reports, her allotted duties in that role in Afghanistan were satisfactory. Her deployment was for six months and Ashcroft returned home in mid 2010.

During the entire time on Afghanistan deployment, Ashcroft left the Camp Russell SOTG base on one occasion and travelled by helicopter to a village with her Commanding Officer. They attended a Shura meeting with Afghanistan locals.

The village had previously been secured by members of 1 Commando Regiment and was considered safe.

During the three hours that Ashcroft and her Commanding Officer were absent from the base and attending the meeting, nothing of a controversial or war like nature occurred. The village was defended by armoured vehicles and at least 200 Afghanistan National Army Soldiers (ANA). Following the uneventful meeting, they returned by helicopter to the SOTG base.

Ashcroft's deployment to Afghanistan concluded in June, 2010 and she returned to Australia as a member of the RAAPC. She continued her Army service in the RAAPC until October 2016. Ashcroft sustained no physical injuries in Afghanistan.

In 2016, well after Ashcroft’s return to Australia, she medically discharged from the Australian Army, due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, which related to a subsequent post Afghanistan personal family incident that occurred in Australia.

Her entire Afghanistan operational deployment was uneventful. During the deployment Ashcroft only left the SOTG base on the one occasion mentioned.

Since Ashcroft’s return to Australia, a number of events have occurred that have given rise to a public perception that Ashcroft was an operational soldier fighting with “Australian Commando Special Forces”. In addition, that Ashcroft was “the first Australian female soldier to fight outside the wire”.

From the 4th to 12th May, 2016, Ashcroft attended the Invictus Games, Orlando, USA, where she competed in swimming and weightlifting as an Australian “wounded warrior.”

On the 15 May, 2016, whilst still a serving soldier, Ashcroft appeared in Army uniform on Australian television in a program called “The Voice,” where she gave details about her Afghanistan service, stating to one of the judges that “I still see things that I can’t unsee and they will be with me forever. I want my war to be over.”

Excerpt from The Voice write up International Business Times – The Voice by Arlene Paredes. 16 May, 2016. (Source IBT)

 

Crissy Ashcroft, 49 (as of 2017), is a war veteran who served actively for 13 years. She suffered serious injuries in her last duty, rendering her unable to continue working in the military. She got emotional while looking back to her time in Afghanistan. Despite being diagnosed with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), Crissy is looking forward with optimism. Her war is over, she said. And she’s on “The Voice” to inspire former military personnel to pursue other things in case their service has ended, too.

Excerpt from 2017 MTV Awards, titled “HAS THE VOICE FOUND THE AUSSIE SUSAN BOYLE? (Source MTV Awards publication.)
Nick Bond.


SUNDAY’S episode of The Voice delivered one of the most emotional moments of the season when 49-year-old war veteran and aspiring performer Crissy Ashcroft took to the stage.

For Ashcroft, who has spent 13 years in the army and deployed to Afghanistan in 2009, the aftershocks of life in a war zone meant even making it to her audition was a battle.
“This morning, getting myself here to this stage has been a really hard road. So many times I said, ‘I can’t do this’,” she admitted. Fighting back tears, Ashcroft revealed that when she deployed to Afghanistan, she “saw things I can’t unsee, and they’ll be with me forever.”
Returning home, she was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.
“I have triggers — If I see a car backfire, I’ll just hit the deck, which looks kind of strange in the middle of Sydney.”

Excerpt from the Daily Mail Australia 20 May, 2016, by Megan Pustetto.

War veteran Chrissy Ashcroft, who delivered a powerful rendition of Cold Chisel's When The War is Over on Sunday, has told more about her on-going fight with PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder).
The rosy-cheeked singer, who developed the anxiety disorder after witnessing harrowing scenes while deployed to Afghanistan in 2009, told WHO magazine: 'Every day for me to get out of the house is a battle.'
• The 49-year-old went on to explain that simple tasks like leaving the home and getting dressed every day she 'can't do any more.'

• What she witnessed during her time as a soldier, she says, left scarred and triggered the mental disorder typically involving disturbed sleep and constant vivid recall of an often traumatic experience.
She told the publication the crippling attacks were a 'bit like alcohol.' (Source Daily Mail Australia.)

Perhaps, one of the most compelling descriptions of her Afghanistan service was in a document titled – “WHEN THE WAR IS OVER.” -
the literary content attributed to a close friend, Ms. Kay Danes, whose name appears at the foot of the document. The article was posted on the Penrith (Sydney) Returned and Services League of Australia (R&SL) Website.


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Ashcroft was also appointed an Ambassador for the Womens Veterans Network Australia (WVNA). Her personal profile appears below –

 

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On her return from the 2016 Orlando Invictus Games, Ashcroft was also appointed the Australian Ambassador for the October, 2018 Invictus Games to be held in Sydney, Australia.

She also receives payment from Claxton Speakers International, who manage public speaking engagements for their listed personnel. Her profile appears below -


CLAXTON SPEAKERS INTERNATIONAL.

Cris Ashcroft is a former Australian Special Forces support soldier, and the first female frontline soldier to fight 'outside the wire' in Afghanistan. Her careers in international sports, and as an Australian Federal Police officer and most recently part of the Australian Invictus Games team and a performer on "The Voice" have brought her in touch with such a range of experiences and people, she can't easily be categorised.

Her defining career is as an, elite Special Forces support soldier, which took its toll with traumatic experiences leading to physical injuries and Chronic PTSD - which is the enemy she fights today. As an athlete, a singer a soldier and a survivor, Cris tells the story of a girl growing up who didn't fit in, but allowed her goals to drive her forward and obstacles out of the way.

She takes audiences to the terrifying frontline of enemy engagement in Afghanistan, with raw honesty and authenticity, and brings them home again to deal with the aftermath, in a positive and inspiring way. Cris's successful appearances on "The Voice" where she sang "When the War is Over", and her selection and participation at the Invictus Games, brought her to international recognition as a respected and decorated soldier with a voice that must be heard. Cris speaks with passion and integrity, and also with dry, irreverent Aussie sense of humour. She enlightens and inspires, bringing hope to everyone who faces challenges in their lives.


We contacted a Claxton Speakers International representative, who informed ANZMI that Ashcroft’s fee to speak at a public or private gathering on the nominated topic is $7,000 Australian dollars plus GST.

Following the above media publications and comments attributed to Ashcroft, ANZMI received numerous communications from former Australian Army personnel, who have stated that Ashcroft’s claims are lies and have been invented to promote her 2018 Invictus Games Ambassador profile, an upcoming vocalist recording contract, and as a prospective author of book offers.

We then requested and received sworn statutory declarations and statements from former Australian Army 1Commando Regiment personnel, and others, who know Ashcroft, and have refuted her claims of “being the first female Australian soldier to fight outside the wire.” and of being blown up in a Bushmaster vehicle.

The Statutory Declarations and statements from these former personnel, state that , inter alia-,

Witness 1. (Served on same deployment as Cristine Ashcroft in Afghanistan.)

* Christine Ashcroft was employed throughout the rotation as a pay clerk and never deployed with any of the commando field elements (FE) or Teams. She was never in the front line, never came under fire, never came face to face with the enemy, never was employed to question or search females in compounds and has no right to be making the false claims she is, in regards to her service in Afghanistan.

* Christine Ashcroft never suffered any injuries as a member of the Australian Defence Force, all of her recorded injuries are as a result of her participation in sport all of which occurred prior to her enlistment.

* Nothing untoward happened in the pay office or anywhere within Camp Russell where she was stationed.

* On one occasion Ashcroft and the Commanding Officer SOTG left Camp Russell and flew by helicopter to a meeting with locals in a 100% secure location. They remained at this meeting for approximately 3 hours and returned by helicopter to Camp Russell. During this entire time, there was no enemy action. The location of the meeting was secured by a commando company with armoured vehicles and up to 200 ANA soldiers. Once again, I reiterate, there was no enemy action, no shooting, no bombing, no fighting of any kind all very peaceful and quiet.

* Whilst in Afghanistan Ashcroft never made any comments or claims that she was injured, unwell or not coping with the deployment.

* Christine Ashcroft has and still is falsely representing Australia and The Invictus Games as a wounded warrior and is continuing to gain financially as a result of her false claims and deceitful lies regarding her service.

Witness 2.

She (Ashcroft) has stated the following to me-;

* She claimed to have delivered a teenage Afghan’s stillborn baby.
* She claimed to have conducted patrols with 1CDO “outside the wire” and was involved in gun fights. (She told me this on numerous occasions)
* She claimed that she was in a Bushmaster that was hit by an IED (Improvised explosive device), where she sustained hearing issues eye and shoulder issues.
* She claimed that she interrogated women over there.
* On her Face book Page, Crissy Ashcroft, she has photos of her in Afghanistan. One photo that she was in the hills of Afghanistan. *
* The photo was taken at the range.


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Witness 3.

* At the 2017 World Championship Para Lifting she walked onto the stage with one crutch. She was asked why all of a sudden she needed crutches. She stated, “I need the crutches because I am extremely unbalanced because of my hearing. I was blown up by an IED in Afghanistan where a plate of the Bushmaster was blown off and hit me”. She then got on the weightlifting bench, did her minimal 60 kg lift then proceeded off stage with the crutch in her other arm. “This totally confused us, as she states clearly she has shoulder injuries. Now the Para Games for weightlifting was completely filmed and is on You Tube.”

* She later informed us that doing the show “The Voice”; it was a tough decision which judge to choose. She stated that she is getting a recording contract and has begun writing songs for her album.

Witnesses 4 and 5. (Both served on same deployment as Cristine Ashcroft in Afghanistan.)

* She never went on any field trips (in Afghanistan) like she claims.

* Crissy most definitely and I REITERATE STRONGLY, Crissy Ashcroft NEVER NEVER went anywhere near a front line, she NEVER EVER came under any enemy fire and CERTAINLY NEVER EVER come face to face with any enemy under fire.

* Crissy didn’t fight outside the wire so the claim she was the first female to fight outside the wire is incorrect and puts to shame the actual female that was.

* She was never ordered to question any female detainee.

* The photos of her holding a weapon are at the weapons firing range.

* Her injuries were sustained outside of the military within her sports of triathlons. She had a shoulder reconstruction prior to her joining up regular army.

* She was certainly not with any Commandos, and I have spoken to all of them, where anything that would have caused PTSD from being under threat or fire.

* No one has heard of any Bushmaster being blown up whilst she was present in it.

* Not one person I have spoken with believes or can confirm she delivered any baby.


Following receipt of the above statutory declarations and statements, and in fairness to Cristine Ashcroft, ANZMI sent Ashcroft an email detailing the allegations made against her by former experienced 1CDO Regiment members, who served in Afghanistan at the identical time, and invited Ashcroft to respond if she wished.

Her response was that all her claims are true and that all the allegations (made about her) are false in their entirety. She then indicated that she would “brief” the State and Federal Police “who will practice due diligence in ascertaining the true online identities of (ANZMI) and those who have also participated in this crime.”
“I further advise you that the allegations contained in your email are defamatory, and cause significant damage to my well-earned reputation.
You will be contacted by my legal team in relation to this in due course.”
Chris Ashcroft.

We invited Ashcroft to complete a statutory declaration refuting the allegations made by her former Army colleagues. Also if she would like to provide the names of witnesses who can verify her claims. We have not had a reply from Ashcroft.

Threats of legal action against ANZMI are a common defence mechanism relied upon by persons who have had their military service questioned. We are not concerned by those threats and only seek to have the truth exposed in the public arena regarding Ashcroft’s claims. They need to be clarified for all concerned.

The criterion for the Invictus Games is below -;

Competing in the 2017 Invictus Games

What are the requirements for competing in the Invictus Games?

To be eligible to compete in the Invictus Games, you must be an active service member or veteran from one of the participating nations, who has been wounded, ill or injured during, or as a direct result of, your service.

So someone didn't review Ashcroft's service before signing off on her eligbility to participate in the Invictus Games!

 

 


It is important for all genuine Australian Invictus Games competitors that selection and/or representation as an Ambassador for those games is a rigorous process, where all candidates meet the necessary requirements honestly and with integrity.

We have notified the Invictus Games officials, the WVNA, and Claxton Speakers International, regarding our research.

The Invictus Games, Sydney, are 17 months away and this matter needs close scrutiny. It is a significant event with anticipated world wide media coverage. There is a great deal of credibility at stake here for the Australian Invictus Games organisers, and importantly, Cristine Ashcroft.

There needs to be an investigation and they need to get it right.

An update will be provided on this site in the near future.

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